Saturday, June 20, 2015

Sat.`s Critters

Cathleen
wheel to spin flax into linen
this girl was amazing, no knics on the sheep & she was so fast
blued eyed alpacas are deaf
llamas & alpacas only have bottom teeth
a flaxen haired girl getting the flax ready to spin
felted
Mia smelling my roses
I am linking up here with Eileen for Sat`s crittershttp://viewingnaturewitheileen.blogspot.com/ Last week my friend, Cathleen & I went over to East Berlin to the handspinning & weaving school , The Mannings, to view the fiber animals & watch various processes of making different yarns & crafts. Here are some of the animals there,plus a few extra pictures ...
angora goat

18 comments:

eileeninmd said...

Hello Phyllis, interesting post and information. I wonder how the blue eyes are connected to their hearing. I love the critters. The alpacas and sheep are cute. Thank you for linking up and sharing your post. Have a happy weekend!

TexWisGirl said...

that's pretty neat! a lot of work goes into that yarn!

Debbie said...

the hand crafted items are just gorgeous!! i learned to knit last summer on an alpaca farm, i visit and knit there often and it has been an amazing experience!!!!

Irma said...

Hello Phyllips,
Thanks for your post on my blog.
Beautiful pictures, nice to see how the sheep are sheared.
A very happy weekend.
Regards, Irma

JoJo said...

Great photos! One of my friends does the most amazing felting work. She would love that place.

Gunilla B├Ąck said...

Wonderful photos of the critters! Interesting to see the different activities. So much work goes into making yarn.

Phyllis Oller said...

Thanks everyone, not sure why they know blue-eyed equals deafness, should have asked, I wondered that myself.phyllis

pattisjarrett said...

Beautiful spun work. I learned a few things about alpacas and llamas that I didn't know. So that's what an Angora goat looks like! I would think it would be delighted to be free of that coat. Sheep shearers know their craft!

JoAnn ( Scene Through My Eyes) said...

What a fun trip - I have a friend that raises alpacas and spins the fibers. She also dyes some of her yarn - gorgeous. Love the photos of all the critters.

ifthethunderdontgetya™³²®© said...

Fascinating critters!
~

Marie C said...

There was a spinning and weaving school every summer near my home when we lived in Texas, and I NEVER WENT!!!! I have always kicked myself over that one, but I was working full time and we didn't have any disposable money, and well, it never seemed reasonable. I would have loved this! Loved your photos!

Joyful said...

Enjoyed this post. I love the shearing, spinning and weaving and I can't do any of it. I admire those who do all this and make beautiful yarns and beautiful garments. The lace shawls are beautiful and intricate. I do love Alpaca wool as it is so very soft. I didn't know some llamas are blind based on eye colour. Poor thing.

JenniferT said...

For eileeninmd- Inside the ears should be the thing that gives skin pigment, melanin. If it isn't present, the ear drums can't pick up sound vibrations. That is the short, simple answer. It is more deeply explained, if you want to look, on the internet. Search 'how melanin affects hearing'. Hope this helps.

Phyllis Oller said...

Thanks Jennifer , Phyllis

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

This was such a fun visit Phyllis. Loved seeing the crafts (art) and your beautiful area! Enjoyed seeing the shearer ... And am old enough to be very pleased that girls can do this job (and very glad that younger generations take that for granted!). Alpacas are so lovable looking ... It's those big eyes I think! I didn't know that blue eyed ones were deaf, but it seems like I've heard something like that about cats?

Loved visiting... My first time here... Thanks for sharing!

bettyl-NZ said...

How interesting to see these processes. I did not know these things about alpacas, so thank you for your information!

Gail Dixon said...

I had no idea that blue-eyed alpacas are deaf. They certainly have the sweetest faces. Really enjoyed all the photos of the shearing. Thanks for sharing such interesting info!

Debra said...

This is a fun post, and I loved seeing the beautifully made shawls too...